The Subjection of Women

The Subjection of Women (1869) offers both detailed argumentation and passionate eloquence in opposition to the social and legal inequalities commonly imposed upon women by a patriarchal culture. Just as in On Liberty, Mill defends the emancipation of women on utilitarian grounds. Mill was convinced that the moral and intellectual advancement of humankind would result in greater happiness for everybody. […]

The Essence of Liberty

by David F. Nolan    As a founder of the Libertarian Party and editor-in-chief of California Liberty, I am often asked how to tell if someone is “really” a libertarian.  There are probably as many different definitions of the word “libertarian” as there are people who claim the label. These range from overly broad (“anyone […]

Economic Point of View: An Essay in the History of Economic Thought

Israel Kirzner is an outstanding student of Mises‘s, and here is his sweeping defense of the Misesian definition of the scope and meaning of economic science. He compares the Misesian view of human action with the neoclassical and classical school, and contrasts their views on rationality, human choice, scarcity, and scientific method. The book came […]

The Transformation of the American Economy, 1865-1914

The Gilded Age, lasting from 1865 to World War I, was an era of economic growth never before seen in the history of the world. The standard of living of the modern age was born during this time of phenomenal transition. Lives lengthen. Wealth exploded. The middle class lived better than kings a century earlier. […]

Thinking as a Science

It’s incredible that this 1916 tutorial on how to think, by none other than Henry Hazlitt, would still hold up after all these years. But here’s why. Hazlitt was largely self-educated. He read voraciously. He trained himself to be a great intellect. In the middle of this process, he discovered that it is far more […]

The Foundations of Morality

Here is Hazlitt‘s major philosophical work, in which he grounds a policy of private property and free markets in an ethic of classical utilitarianism, understood in the way Mises understood that term. In writing this book, Hazlitt is reviving an 18th and 19th century tradition in which economists wrote not only about strictly economic issues […]

Tiger by the Tail

F.A. Hayek said that his biggest regret in a lifetime of writing was that he never wrote a book-length refutation of Keynesian economics. He seriously doubted that Keynesian style planning would ever captivate governments, so he focused on different things. Economist Sudha Shenoy decided to rectify the problem. As a Hayek scholar, she noted that […]

The Road to Serfdom (.pdf version)

Finally, here is an edition of Road to Serfdom that does justice to its monumental status in the history of liberty. It contains a foreword by the editor of the Hayek Collected Works, Bruce Caldwell. Caldwell has added helpful explanatory notes and citation corrections, among other improvements. For this reason, the publisher decided to call this “the […]

Individualism and Economic Order

If you are looking to acquaint yourself with F.A. Hayek‘s perspective on economic theory–beyond his business cycle and monetary studies of the interwar years–this is the best source. The collection appeared in 1947, before he moved on toward broader culturaland social investigations. It contains his most profound work on the liberal economic order, and his […]

Common Sense Economics

Professor Hahn, one of the greatest but least known Austrian economists of his generation, offers a fantastic refutation of Keynesian macroeconomics, including its wild obsession with effective demand, and also a systematic presentation of the Austrian theory of the business cycle.   It might have been common sense in his day, but it is surely […]