The Fabian Strategy

The aims of the Fabian Society were developed by Webb from what Englishman John Ruskin (1819-1900) taught at Oxford University. Ruskin, a teacher at the Working Men’s College (founded in 1854 by Christian-Socialist philosopher J. F. D. Maurice), a professor of Fine Arts at Oxford, an artist and writer, based his views on those of Socialist Robert Owen. He advocated a utopian society, and espoused theories developed from the teachings of Plato (428-347 BC), who had studied under Socrates, and became the greatest philosopher in history. Plato established an academy which operated for 800 years, producing many great men, including Aristotle. In his work, The Republic, he outlined his ideal society, which was an aristocratic society ruled by the elite. It included the elimination of marriage and the family, and introduced selective breeding by the government which would destroy all inferior offspring. In Plato’s utopia, sexual equality dictated that women would fight alongside the men in times of war.

The Fabians were working towards a new world by indoctrinating young scholars who would eventually rise to power in various policy-making positions throughout the world by infiltrating educational institutions, government agencies, and political parties. Their strategy was called the “doctrine of inevitability of gradualism,” which meant that their goals would be gradually achieved. So gradual, that nobody would notice, or “without breach of continuity or abrupt change of the entire social issue.” The secret was evolution, not revolution, or what Webb called “permeation.” Shaw (whose mistress, Florence Farr, was a witch in the Order of the Golden Dawn), revealed that their goal was to be achieved by “stealth, intrigue, subversion, and the deception of never calling Socialism by its right name.” In fact, that’s how they got their name. The name originated from the Roman Consul, General Quintus Fabius Maximus, the Cunctator (‘Delayer’), who through patient, cautious, delaying and elusive tactics during the early phases of the Second Punic War (218-201 BC) enabled the Roman army to regroup and defeat Hannibal’s stronger Carthaginian army.

In 1905, American Fabians established the Rand School of [Social Science] in New York City. On September 12, 1905, five of the Fabians met at Peck’s Restaurant in New York’s Lower Manhattan: Upton Sinclair (well-known author and socialist), Jack London (well-known fiction writer), Rev. Thomas Wentworth Higginson (a Unitarian minister), J.G. Phelps Stokes, and Clarence Darrow (legendary lawyer). They incorporated the Intercollegiate Socialist Society for the purpose of promoting “an intelligent interest in socialism among college men and women,” and established chapters at Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, New York University, and the University of Pennsylvania. Their true purpose was to begin de-Christianizing America.

One of its founding members was John Dewey, the father of progressive education, whose philosophy consisted of “atheism, socialism and evolution.” In 1921, they changed their name to the League for Industrial Democracy, whose purpose was “education for a new social order based on production for use and not for profit.” They established a network of 125 chapters. Dewey would later serve as its Vice-President, and in 1941, became its President.

The Fabians had broken away from the Liberal Party in the 1890’s and contributed to the founding of the Labor Representation Committee, which in 1906, became the Labour Party. Shaw called for “wire-pulling” the government in order to get Socialist measures passed. In 1918, the Labour Party adopted a program which implemented the ideas of Fabianism.

In 1931, the New Fabian Research Bureau was organized, joining the Fabian Society in 1938 to form a reorganized group. In 1940, the Colonial Bureau of the Fabian Society was established; and in 1941, the Fabian International Bureau was formed, which catered to international issues.

In December, 1942, the Fabians published the Beveridge Report, written by Sir William Beveridge (later made a Lord), who made a long list of promises to Britons, if they would accept his package of social reforms. In 1945, Fabian Socialists took control of the House of Commons, on the strength of the Report, and the Parliamentary Reforms, which had been published eleven years earlier by Sir Ivor Jennings. Within a few years, British industries and services were nationalized and put under government control, which now meant that the Rothschilds were able to control more, because all the banks were forced to use Bank of England notes, instead of their own.

At its peak in 1946, the Fabian Society had 8,400 members in 80 local chapters. Among their members: Bertrand Russell (philologist, mathematician and philosopher), (Pandit) Motilal Nehru (father of India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharial Nehru, and leader of the Independence movement who founded the Swaraj, or ‘self-rule’ Party), and Ramsey MacDonald (Prime Minister of England in 1924, 1929-35). Nearly half of all Labour Party representatives of the Parliament in the House of Commons were members, along with most Party leaders.

Today, from their headquarters at 11 Dartmouth Street, in London, they spread their ideas among teachers, civil servants, politicians, union officials, and other influential people. They publish the Fabian Review magazine. They also hold meetings, lectures, conferences, and seminars; do research in political, economic, and social problems; and publish their findings and views in magazines, books and pamphlets. Their concentration has been mainly on reforms to social services and the nationalization of industry.

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