Thinking as a Science

It’s incredible that this 1916 tutorial on how to think, by none other than Henry Hazlitt, would still hold up after all these years. But here’s why. Hazlitt was largely self-educated. He read voraciously. He trained himself to be a great intellect. In the middle of this process, he discovered that it is far more […]

The Right to Ignore the State

by Herbert Spencer This essay is taken from chapter 19 of Spencer’s first major work of political philosophy — Social Statics: or, The Conditions essential to Happiness specified, and the First of them Developed (1851) — in which his first principle is that of Equal Liberty: “that every man may claim the fullest liberty to exercise his faculties […]

On Moral Education

by Herbert Spencer As reprinted in Left and Right, Spring 1966, edited by Murray N. Rothbard. Rothbard’s Editorial Note: Education is a perennially important and controversial subject, especially in a country as child-centered as the United States. Within libertarian ranks, an unlimited diversity of viewpoint prevails, ranging from rigorous traditionalists to ultra-progressives. Among the numerous libertarians in […]

The Man versus the State

INTRODUCTION In 1851 Herbert Spencer published a treatise called Social Statics; or, The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified. Among other specifications, this work established and made clear the fundamental principle that society should be “organised on the basis of voluntary cooperation, not on the· basis of compulsory cooperation,· or under the threat of it. In a word, it established the […]